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The Broadway Presbyterian Church

Members’ Notices

Autumn Concert 2016

Autumn Concert 2016

We kick off the 2016-17 season with an exciting program of three works that are new to the orchestra.

Spring Concert 2016

Spring Concert 2016

‘Cellist Maxine Neuman returns with music director Mike Tietz in the Dvorak ‘Cello Concerto, and works by Haydn, Weber, and Marquez.

Winter Concert 2016

Winter Concert 2016

Music Director Mike Tietz leads the orchestra with violin prodigy Yaegy Park in music of Bach, Beethoven, Milhaud and Poulenc.

Autumn Concert 2015

Autumn Concert 2015

Guest conductor Diane Wittry returns with music of Strauss, Brahms and a work of her own.

BBE Appreciation Day in Manhattan

BBE Appreciation Day in Manhattan

The Borough President of Manhattan proclaimed last Sunday as “Broadway Bach Ensemble Appreciation Day,” in honor of our 30th anniversary.

At intermission of our Spring, 2015, concert, original orchestra member Paula Washington spoke of her long friendship with Mike Tietz, the group’s founder; and violist Nancy Dunetz presented him with a framed Proclamation.

Here are a few photos.

Board member Nancy Dunetz presents Mike with the framed proclamation.

Board member Nancy Dunetz presents Mike with the framed proclamation.

Music Director and orchestra founder Mike Tietz shows off the official proclamation.

Music Director and orchestra founder Mike Tietz shows off the official proclamation.

Founding member Paula Washington reminisces about her long friendship with founder Mike Tietz.

Founding member Paula Washington reminisces about her long friendship with founder Mike Tietz.

Chamber Concert

Chamber Concert

Tuesday June 3, 2014 at 7:30pm, The Broadway Bach Ensemble presents a free summer concert of chamber music, featuring musicians from the orchestra.

Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Trio Op. 1 No. 3
1st Movement: Allegro con Brio

Sylvia Rubin, Violin
Ann Taylor, ‘Cello
Alison Brewster Franzetti, Piano  

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Clarinet Quintet K581
1st Movement: Allegro

Robert Snyder, Clarinet
David Obelkevich, Violin I
Harriet Levine, Violin II
Susan Borbay, Viola
Lenny Mims, ‘Cello

Gordon Jacob: Miniature Suite for for Clarinet and Viola
1. March. Alla marcia, giocoso
2. Berceuse. Andante tranquillo
3. Minuet and Trio. Grazioso, poco meno mosso
4. Fugue. Allegro molto

Paula Washington, Viola
Aaron Abramovitz, Clarinet

Felix Mendelssohn: Piano Trio in C minor, Op. 66
1st Movement: Allegro energico e con fuoco

Guy Kettelhack, Violin
Mike Tietz, ‘Cello
Arlene Hajinlian, Piano     

Gioacchino Rossini: Quartet for Flute, Violin, Viola and Violoncello No. 1 in G Major
1. Moderato
3. Rondo Allegro

David Rosen, Flute
Nina Basescu, Violin
Nancy Dunetz, Viola
Lenny Mims, ‘Cello   

Eduard Franck (1817-1893): String Sextet #1 in Eb Major, Op. 41
1st Movement: Allegro
 Arun Ravi, Violin I
Louise Moed,Violin II
Tom Frenkel, Viola I
Daniel Hyman,Viola II
Kurt Behnke, ‘Cello
Morton Cohn – Bass

 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Ave Verum Corpus
Tom Flaherty: A ‘Cellist’s Variations on Home on the Range

‘Cello Quartet: “A Consonance of ‘Cellos”
Steve Flanders
Mike Tietz
Kurt Behnke
Carl Courant

Violin Concerto

Violin Concerto

The violin concerto was Barber’s first significant commissioned work. Barber began composing the concerto in 1939 while on a trip to Switzerland. Upon the outbreak of World War II, he returned to the United States and completed the concerto later that year. The concerto was premiered by Albert Spalding with the Philadelphia Orchestra in 1941. Ever since then, it has been a staple of the violin concerto repertoire.

Barber provided these program notes for the premiere performance:

The first movement — allegro molto moderato — begins with a lyrical first subject announced at once by the solo violin, without any orchestral introduction. This movement as a whole has perhaps more the character of a sonata than concerto form. The second movement — andante sostenuto — is introduced by an extended oboe solo. The violin enters with a contrasting and rhapsodic theme, after which it repeats the oboe melody of the beginning. The last movement, a perpetuum mobile, exploits the more brilliant and virtuosic character of the violin.